C:\Documents and Settings\EvaD\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\M7ZM13K5\MPj04000140000[1].jpg


Immokalee Water & SeWer DIStrIct


2014 QualIty on tap report


image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

2014 Quality on Tap Report

Immokalee Water & Sewer District

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber. Por favor llame (239) 658-3630 para ayuda

en traducir o entender este informe.


Document sa genyen anpil gro infomasyon sou afe dlo-a. Si ou manke compren li, rele nan numero sa-a (239) 658-3630.

2014 Quality on Tap Report

Immokalee Water & Sewer District

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber. Por favor llame (239) 658-3630 para ayuda

en traducir o entender este informe.


Document sa genyen anpil gro infomasyon sou afe dlo-a. Si ou manke compren li, rele nan numero sa-a (239) 658-3630.

We're very pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the quality water and services that we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from wells. Our wells draw from the Lower Tamiami, Hawthorn, and Sandstone Aquifers. In 2013 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. The assessment was conducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. There are fourteen unique potential sources of contamination identified for this system. These range from moderate susceptibility levels (underground fuel tanks), to low susceptibility levels, which include an injection well and wastewater plant. The assessment results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp. Our water is treated with aeration for odor control, the pH is adjusted and it is disinfected using chlorine and ammonia. We also fluoridate the water for dental health purposes.

We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact the Executive Director, Eva J. Deyo or the Water Department Supervisor at (239) 658-3630.


We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 4:30

    1. in our Board Room, located at 1020 Sanitation Road, Immokalee.


      Immokalee Water & Sewer District routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period, of January 1st to December 31st 2014. Data obtained before January 1, 2014, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

      In the table below you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:


      Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology


      Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.


      Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.


      Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs to not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.


      Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.


      Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

      Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.


      “ND” means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.


      Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.


      Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (µg/l) – one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.


      Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) - measure of the radioactivity in water.


      EPA requires monitoring of over 80 drinking water contaminants. Those contaminants listed in the table below are the only contaminants detected in your drinking water.


      If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Immokalee Water and Sewer District is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

      WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS


      ** Results in the Level Detected column for radioactive contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling point, depending on the sampling frequency.

      Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

      Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

      MCL

      Violation Y/N

      Level Detected**

      Range of Results

      MCLG

      MCL

      Likely Source of Contamination

      Radioactive Contaminants

      5. Alpha emitters (pCi/L)

      05/11

      N

      2.8

      0-2.8

      0

      15

      Erosion of natural deposits

      6. Radium 226 + 228 or combined radium (pCi/L)

      05/11

      N

      1.4

      0-1.4

      0

      5

      Erosion of natural deposits

      Inorganic Contaminants


      12. Barium (ppm)


      05/14


      N


      .0223


      .0152-

      .0223


      2


      2

      Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits


      16. Cyanide (ppb)


      05/14


      N


      8.58


      0-8.58


      200


      200

      Discharge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories

      17. Fluoride (ppm)

      05/14

      N

      .893

      .57 -

      .893

      4

      4

      Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

      Water additive which promotes strong teeth when at optimum levels between 0.7 and

      1.3 ppm.

      24. Sodium (ppm)

      05/14

      N

      48.14

      16.8-

      48.14

      n/a

      160

      Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil

      Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides

      33. Dalapon (ppb)

      09/14

      N

      4.6

      4.6

      200

      200

      Runoff from herbicide used on rights of way

      Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

      Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)

      MCL

      Violation Y/N

      Level Detected**

      Range of Results

      MCLG

      MCL

      Likely Source of Contamination

      Volatile Organic Contaminants

      66. 1,2-Dichloropropane (ppb)


      05/14-08/14


      N


      1.6


      ND-1.6


      0


      5

      Discharge from industrial chemical factories

      Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products

      Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

      Dates of sampling (mo/yr)

      MCL

      Violation (Y/N)


      Level Detected


      Range of Results


      MCLG


      MCL


      Likely Source of Contamination


      85. Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb)

      12/13

      03/14

      07/14

      12/14


      N


      33.92


      2.32-54.3


      N/A


      60

      By-product of drinking water disinfection


      86. Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) (ppb)

      12/13

      03/14

      07/14

      12/14


      N


      24.69


      5.17-

      33.7


      N/A


      80


      By-product of drinking water disinfection

      IWSD failed to take the 2nd Quarter TTHM & HAA5 Samples, in the correct location, and sent out a public notice in July 2014 to the customers.

      Although IWSD did not perform appropriate monitoring for TTHMs or HAA5s during the second calendar quarter of 2014, the system did collect samples for TTHMs and HAA5s at the 4 appropriate locations during the first calendar quarter of 2014, and the fourth calendar quarter of 2013. The laboratory results of the samples collected on March 18, 2014, and December 11, 2013, indicated the TTHM and HAA5 concentrations were all in compliance with their Maximum Contaminant Levels, and IWSD took the samples in July 2014 in the correct location.



      Contaminant and Unit of Measurement


      Dates of sampling (mo./yr.)


      AL Exceeded (Y/N)


      90th Percentile Result

      No. of sampling sites exceeding the AL


      MCLG


      AL

      (Action Level)


      Likely Source of Contamination

      Lead and Copper (Tap Water)

      77. Copper (tap water) (ppm)

      07/14-

      09/14

      N

      .195

      0

      1.3

      1.3

      Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

      78. Lead (tap water) (ppb)

      07/14-

      09/14

      N

      2.50

      0

      0

      15

      Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits

      SECONDARY CONTAMINANTS TABLE

      Contaminant and Unit of Measurement

      Dates of sampling (mo/yr)

      MCL

      Violation Y/N


      Highest Result

      Range of Results


      MCLG


      MCL

      Likely Source of Contamination

      Secondary Contaminants

      6. Iron (ppm) *TT

      12/14

      N

      .617

      .196-

      .617

      0.3

      Natural occurrence from soil leaching

      Note : *TT: Treatment Technique – Pursuant to Rule 62-550.325(1), suppliers of water may use sequestering agents in lieu of meeting the MCL for iron and manganese when the maximum concentration of iron plus manganese does not exceed 1.0 milligrams per liter in water.


      image

      Sometimes people complain about the color of the water. This is usually caused by iron in the water. This can occur in a home where little water is used or in a school after a weekend when there is no water used. This can be cleared up by running the water for a few minutes, until clear water comes out of the faucet.

      Sometimes people complain about the color of the water. This is usually caused by iron in the water. This can occur in a home where little water is used or in a school after a weekend when there is no water used. This can be cleared up by running the water for a few minutes, until clear water comes out of the faucet.

      We test for you!

      In 2011, IWSD began a program to install backflow testing devices on all of the residences in Immokalee. This program was primarily funded with a grant from FDEP, through the EPA – under the ARRA stimulus program. A backflow preventer is a means or mechanism to prevent backflow. The basic means of preventing backflow is an air gap, which either eliminates a cross connection or provides a barrier to backflow. The basic mechanism for preventing backflow is a mechanical backflow preventer, which provides a physical barrier to backflow. The principal types of mechanical backflow preventers are the reduced pressure principle assembly, the pressure vacuum breaker assembly and the double check valve assembly. The standard device required by the Immokalee Water & Sewer District is a reduced pressure principle assembly, or RPZ.


      Our Wastewater Expansion Project began construction during 2012. It included an expansion from 2.5 mgd to 3.25 mgd at the existing wastewater facility. It also included a sewer force main from Arrowhead PUD to the wastewater plant. We began the process of switching our Residuals Management process to the Schwing Bioset Process. During 2013 we had begun the building permit process. It was completed in 2014.



      Our website is frequently updated in order to provide you with necessary forms, and documents. It includes Board Meeting minutes, rates and fees, and Resolutions that may affect you, as a customer. It also has current and previous years “Quality on Tap” reports. Please visit our website at www.iw-sd.com.

      Our website is frequently updated in order to provide you with necessary forms, and documents. It includes Board Meeting minutes, rates and fees, and Resolutions that may affect you, as a customer. It also has current and previous years “Quality on Tap” reports. Please visit our website at www.iw-sd.com.

      image



      ONLINE BILL PAY NOW AVAILABLE

      For those customers who would prefer the flexibility of using online bill pay, that option is now available. For more information, contact our office on how to set up your account. Please go to the Online Bill Pay page, and then click on the link to set up your account. Once you have successfully set up your account, you can review and pay your bills at your convenience.

      Please go to http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay to set up your account.


      PAGO DE FACTURAS EN LÍNEA YA ESTÁ DISPONIBLE

      Para aquellos clientes que prefieren la flexibilidad del uso de pago de facturas en línea, esta opción está disponible. Para obtener más información, póngase en contacto con nuestra oficina sobre cómo configurar su cuenta. Por favor vaya a la página de pago de facturas en línea y luego haga clic en el enlace para configurar tu cuenta. Una vez que ha configurado correctamente su cuenta, usted puede revisar y pagar sus facturas a su conveniencia.

      Por favor vaya a http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay para configurar su cuenta.


      ONLINE BILL PEYE KOULYE A DISPONIB

      Pou sa kliyan ki ta prefere bay fleksibilite itilize ki peye bil online, sa chwa a koulye a disponib. Pou plis enfòmasyon, kontakte Biwo nou sou kouman pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou. Souple ale nan paj Online Bill peye, Et puis klike sou lyen an pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou. Yon fwa ke, nou te anpil siksè pwepare kont anbank ou, ou ka revize epi peye dèt ou nan pratik ou.

      Souple ale nan http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou.


      ONLINE BILL PAY NOW AVAILABLE

      For those customers who would prefer the flexibility of using online bill pay, that option is now available. For more information, contact our office on how to set up your account. Please go to the Online Bill Pay page, and then click on the link to set up your account. Once you have successfully set up your account, you can review and pay your bills at your convenience.

      Please go to http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay to set up your account.


      PAGO DE FACTURAS EN LÍNEA YA ESTÁ DISPONIBLE

      Para aquellos clientes que prefieren la flexibilidad del uso de pago de facturas en línea, esta opción está disponible. Para obtener más información, póngase en contacto con nuestra oficina sobre cómo configurar su cuenta. Por favor vaya a la página de pago de facturas en línea y luego haga clic en el enlace para configurar tu cuenta. Una vez que ha configurado correctamente su cuenta, usted puede revisar y pagar sus facturas a su conveniencia.

      Por favor vaya a http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay para configurar su cuenta.


      ONLINE BILL PEYE KOULYE A DISPONIB

      Pou sa kliyan ki ta prefere bay fleksibilite itilize ki peye bil online, sa chwa a koulye a disponib. Pou plis enfòmasyon, kontakte Biwo nou sou kouman pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou. Souple ale nan paj Online Bill peye, Et puis klike sou lyen an pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou. Yon fwa ke, nou te anpil siksè pwepare kont anbank ou, ou ka revize epi peye dèt ou nan pratik ou.

      Souple ale nan http://www.iw-sd.com/index.php?p=1_31_Online-Bill-Pay pou mete sou pye nan kont anbank ou.

      The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.


      Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

      1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

      2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

      3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

      4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by- products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

      5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.


In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.


Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1- 800-426-4791.


In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply it will be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.


Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno- compromised persons such as persons with cancer

undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).


Please DO NOT FLUSH your unused/unwanted medications down toilets or sink drains. For more information, please click here at: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/medications/page s/disposal.htm.


We at Immokalee Water & Sewer District would like for you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed.


Did you know?


The Immokalee Water & Sewer District was created by an Act of the Florida Legislature on July 5, 1978, for the purpose of providing water and sewer services to Immokalee, an unincorporated area of Collier County, Florida. The District operates and maintains the water and sewer plants and systems as a Special District of the State of Florida. The District is governed by a seven member Board of Commissioners, appointed by the Governor of the State of Florida. The Board of Commissioners administers the District, independent from any other local governing body. The District currently employs 39 people.


Board of Commissioners:



Board meetings are held the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 4:30 p.m.


Please visit our website at www.iw-sd.com for more information about the Immokalee Water & Sewer District, or to download current or prior year “Quality on Tap” reports in English or Spanish.